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Forest Challenge Board Game

NGOC is again offering the orienteering board game “Forest Challenge” for sale.
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Mapping Data

This website contains mapping data licensed from the Ordnance Survey with the permission of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office © Crown Copyright 2011. All rights reserved. Licence Number 100005988

Coaching

For all coaches a new DVO coaching handbook has been published which gives useful information and tips for all involved in coaching other orienteers.

The handbook is available as a word download.

COACHING TIPS

A couple of tips for beginners……

At the Start

At the start you should first take a moment to identify the location of the start – shown by a red triangle on the map – and relate the features around you to what is shown on the map. Then decide on your plan for getting to the first control.

Resist the temptation to dash off immediately before you have established where you are and decided on your strategy. Make sure that you set off in the right direction.

It generally pays to be a bit more cautious with your navigation at the start of the course, until you get the feel of the map and settle into your navigating routine. There will be plenty of time to run hard later on the course.

Folding and Thumbing the Map

The map is likely to be A4 or A3 size – this can be very tricky to hold and it is not necessary to see all of it at once, so, fold it up so that all you are looking at is the route to the next couple of controls or so. This way it is easier to hold, and, there is less to look at enabling you to focus on the route ahead. Keep refolding as the course progresses, with the map folded, map orientation is easier.

The next trick is to use your thumb to show exactly where you are – the position of your thumb and the map can be easily adjusted as you pass by features so your thumb keeps your position on the map. This way means that you do not have to keep on stopping to work put where you are.

Both of these techniques once mastered will only take seconds to do but may save minutes in the grand scheme of things.